Basilar Migraines

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Migraines can be more than just a pain in the head.  Basilar migraines, once known as basilar artery migraines or BAMs, are an extraordinarily rare but potentially life-threatening variant of the classic migraine with aura.

Basilar migraines, once known as basilar artery migraines or BAMs, are an extraordinarily rare but potentially life-threatening variant of the classic migraine with aura Insurance Gas/Electricity Loans Mortgage Attorney Lawyer Donate Conference Call Degree Credit Treatment Software Classes Recovery Trading Rehab Hosting Transfer Cord Blood Claim compensation mesothelioma mesothelioma attorney Houston car accident lawyer moreno valley can you sue a doctor for wrong diagnosis doctorate in security top online doctoral programs in business educational leadership doctoral programs online car accident doctor atlanta car accident doctor atlanta accident attorney rancho Cucamonga truck accident attorney san Antonio ONLINE BUSINESS DEGREE PROGRAMS ACCREDITED online accredited psychology degree masters degree in human resources online public administration masters degree online bitcoin merchant account bitcoin merchant services compare car insurance auto insurance troy mi seo explanation digital marketing degree florida seo company fitness showrooms stamford ct how to work more efficiently seo wordpress tips meaning of seo what is an seo what does an seo do what seo stands for best seo tips google seo advice seo steps

Basilar migraine symptoms are caused by constriction of the basilar artery, which supplies blood to the brain stem.  BAMs were originally thought to affect only young women and adolescent girls, but research shows that while they are primarily a problem for these groups they can occur in people of all ages and genders.

During the aura phase, basilar migraine symptoms may include loss of balance, double vision or partial vision loss, lack of coordination, numbness on one or both sides of the body, weakness, dizziness or confusion and severe vomiting.  

The symptoms typically last an hour or less and disappear when the headache begins, but may last as long as days after the headache pain has disappeared.  Some basilar migraine sufferers pass out or lose consciousness during the aura phase as well.  In extremely rare cases, they may even slip into a coma that can last hours or days.

The danger of basilar migraines is that they can lead to a transient ischemic attack (TIA) or stroke.  A transient ischemic attack is essentially a miniature stroke resulting from a temporary interruption of the flow of blood to the brain. 

Unlike strokes, TIAs have not been shown to cause permanent damage to the brain and most neurological problems that arise from them, like slurred speech or weakness on one side, clear up within twenty-four hours of the attack.

The basilar artery is located at the back of head.  The headache associated with basilar migraines is usually a severe throbbing ache on both sides of the back of the head, as opposed to the unilateral temple throbbing more commonly associated with migraines.

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